Want to Lose Weight and Feel Better? Then Ditch the Fad Diets

The secret to weight loss and healthy diet is that there is no secret. Your mother’s advice, “Eat Your Vegetables!” is still the predominant wisdom when it comes to eating right. There’s no magic weight-loss pill or new undiscovered combination of superfoods that will replace her emotional plea. The latest research continues to point out that the way to good health and long life is eating lots of fresh foods, that is, fruits and vegetables, nuts, whole grains and leafy greens.

PB-Postcard-Jan-2017-v2-front

In a new study by the American College of Cardiology, in which they surveyed some of the latest and most popular nutrition fads, including juicing, gluten-free diets and antioxidant pills, the scholars determined that most of the claims of the promoters of these ideas for nutrition are unsubstantiated.

Here are some of the key myths they addressed in their report:

  • Eggs and cholesterol: Although a U.S. government report issued in 2015 dropped specific recommendations about upper limits for cholesterol consumption, the review concludes, “it remains prudent to advise patients to significantly limit intake of dietary cholesterol in the form of eggs or any high cholesterol foods to as little as possible.”
  • Vegetable oils: According to the authors, coconut oil and palm oil should be discouraged due to limited data supporting routine use. The most heart-healthy oil is olive oil, though perhaps in moderation as it is still higher calorie, research suggests.
  • Berries and antioxidant supplementation: Fruits and vegetables are the healthiest and most beneficial source of antioxidants to reduce heart disease risk, the review explains. There is no compelling evidence adding high-dose antioxidant dietary supplements benefits heart health.
  • Nuts: Nuts can be part of a heart-healthy diet. But beware of consuming too many, because nuts are high in calories, said the authors.
  • Juicing:The authors explain that while the fruits and vegetables contained in juices are heart-healthy, the process of juicing concentrates calories, which makes it is much easier to ingest too many. Eating whole fruits and vegetables is preferred, with juicing primarily reserved for situations when daily intake of vegetables and fruits is inadequate. If you do juice, avoid adding extra sugar by putting in honey, to minimize calories.
  • Gluten: People who have celiac disease or other gluten sensitivity must avoid gluten – wheat, barley and rye. For patients who don’t have any gluten sensitivities, many of the claims for health benefits of a gluten-free diet are unsubstantiated, the authors conclude.

Food is the most important factor in ensuring good health and our best medicine. And fresh foods are the key part of that medicine cabinet. Produce Buzz was created to help spread this message far and wide. We are joining the crusade that has been going on in the nutritional and medical communities for a long time.

But still research shows that only a small percentage of people around the world get the recommended amount of fresh fruit and vegetables on a daily basis. Please join us and bookmark the Produce Buzz Website and follow us in all of our social media channels.

And join in the conversation by sharing your favorite recipes, farmer’s markets finds and gardening triumphs. Welcome to the community!

 

 

Want to Lose Weight and Feel Better? Then Ditch the Fad Diets

The New York Times is Making You Fat!

reading newspaper
Are newspapers subtly suggesting to us what to eat? The research says…well..maybe!

The old expression, “You are what you eat” can be given a new twist after the conclusions of a new study were released this month. We can now say, “You are what you read” or at the very least, “You eat what you read.”

According to a study published in BMC Public Health by a research team from Cornell University and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, the obesity rate for the United States and Britain over the last 50 years has directly correlated to what types of food were most often mentioned in the New York Times and the London Times. The studies authors, Brian Wansink and Brennan Davis, concluded that, “United States obesity prevalence is positively associated with New York Times mentions of sweet snacks… and negatively associated with mentions of fruits… and vegetables. Similar results are found for the United Kingdom and The London Times.”

The researchers looked at articles from the past 50 years of the New York Times and for the past 17 years in London Times and set values based upon mentions of unhealthy salty and sweet snacks on one side and mentions of fruit and vegetables on the healthy side. That was then correlated to the obesity rates (Body Mass Index or BMI) of each nation. They concluded that the predominance of one or the other, unhealthy versus healthy food references, in the papers could generally predict the rise or fall of obesity rates three years ahead of time.

The study stated that obesity rates in U.S. has risen from 13.4% to 33.8% since 1960 while the U.K. obesity rate has risen from 15% to 25.4% since 1993. The researchers analysis showed that articles mentioning vegetables declined by 46 %, and articles mentioning fruits, salty snacks, and sweet snacks increased (92 %, 417 %, and 310 %) over the last 50 years in the New York Times.

No doubt many of you are already scratching your head at the potential flaws in this correlation. Even the authors Wansink and Davis admit that their study has “limitations worth discussing.” They rightly acknowledge that their research is not exhaustive and does not show any real evidence that the Times newspapers are the cause of the obesity. They certainly did not have time nor desire to study the context of the mentions of those unhealthy or healthy food words. In some cases the articles might not even be talking about food. One example they give in the caveats is that the term popcorn might have been used in an article describing Styrofoam packing materials for shipping.

So we take this study with a few grains of salt (Oh No! Has that phrase sent you to the kitchen looking for potato chips?). But at Produce Buzz, we think there could be something to this “power of suggestion.” Who among hasn’t experienced the sudden craving for ice cream or chocolate or a buttery box of popcorn after an ever so slight suggestion from a faint familiar smell or a ever so subtle mention of one of our favorite snacks? Did we succumb to the urge or did we bury it in our subconscious only to have it revive soon after? Similarly, suggestions of our favorite fruits and vegetables can send us in the opposite direction. So how we eat can depend greatly on what our minds are ingesting. That’s a big part of our mission at Produce Buzz—to keep the good food in the front of our readers’ minds as much as possible so we can help turn the tide on obesity.

Fifty years of fat: news coverage of trends that predate obesity prevalence

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The New York Times is Making You Fat!

Who Can Eat Five A Day?

5 a dayFor almost a quarter of a century fresh produce advocates, foundations for disease prevention and government health agencies in the U.S. have pushed the message that eating five servings of fruits and vegetables a day is optimal for maintaining and improving one’s health. But a new survey released at the very end of 2014 shows that only about 15% of Americans eat at least five fruits and veggies a day. The poll was sponsored by the National Alliance for Hispanic Health and compared Hispanic health issues with those of Whites and “Non-Hispanic Blacks.” One of the health questions was, “On average, how many servings of fruits and vegetables do you eat each day?”

The sampling was pretty evenly split between the three ethnic groups, but showed that Hispanics were the least likely to attain the five-a-day goal (only 7%). Whites were the most successful at meeting the number but even among them only 18% said they did. After 20-plus years of promoting the idea, have the experts conceded the goal is unrealistic?

In 1991 the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH) organized a national campaign in the United States to promote the Five-a-Day slogan. It gained a lot of exposure and press, and became a message with “household recognition.” If you were a fan of the very popular 1990s sitcom Seinfeld you may have noticed in several episodes the Five-a-Day logo posted on a window of the produce market where Jerry Seinfeld and his friends shopped for their veggies. How effective that very subliminal exposure was for the campaign can certainly be debated, but the fact that the PBH got the creators of the show to place it on screen was a big coup and showed how widespread the message became.

In the early 2000s, The World Health Organization (WHO) got on board and has since prompted several other major countries to adopt the Five-a-Day message. They continue to expand it around the world.

But In 2007 PBH re-launched its effort to promote more consumption of produce by rebranding the Five-a-Day campaign to “Fruits and Veggies—More Matters.” From then on the message has been “Half your plate” instead of “Five a Day.” Maybe half a plate is more attainable and easier for people to assess than five a day? If so, perhaps the next poll conducted will make that the question, and we will see the results.

We applaud the valiant efforts of PBH and the team at Fruits and Veggies More Matters. It’s important work and we are confident it has made a difference in the lives of many. Stay tuned to the Produce Buzz blog for more on this topic. We will be speaking with the experts to highlight their efforts to get more people eating more fresh produce.

Produce for Better Health Foundation
Fruit and Veggies – More Matters
World Health Organization’s Promotion of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

Who Can Eat Five A Day?